Don't Waste Your Strength

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Growing up, I realized certain things were expected of me. Some of these expectations were spoken, and many others were not. All parents have expectations for their children. It's built into us. We know it inherently.

Not all expectations are good and beneficial. We all tend to replicate or reject what we know from experience. Children growing up in difficult or dysfunctional homes may become strict or harsh parents. On the other hand, their own household may have little structure or discipline.

Each of us choose the way we will go. Either we choose something similar by default, or consciously choose a better or different way. This choice has consequences. We either make wise and beneficial choices, or squander our opportunity in self-destructive behavior.

Scripture

These are the words of King Lemuel, the message his mother taught him: “My son, I gave birth to you. You are the son I prayed for. Don’t waste your strength on women or your time on those who ruin kings. “Kings should not drink wine, Lemuel, and rulers should not desire beer. [vss 1-4]

If they drink, they might forget the law and keep the needy from getting their rights. Give beer to people who are dying and wine to those who are sad. Let them drink and forget their need and remember their misery no more. [vss 5-7]

“Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves; defend the rights of all those who have nothing. Speak up and judge fairly, and defend the rights of the poor and needy.” [vss 8-9]

(Proverbs 31:1-9 NCV) [Context– Proverbs 31]

Key phrase— If they drink, they might forget the law

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Digging Deeper...

What is the wise advice this mother speaks to her son?

Do you think this is an anti-alcohol message, or is there more to it than that?

Why is this son (the king) encouraged not to indulge in excessive drinking?

What is this son (the king) encouraged to do? How is it expressed as a choice?

Reflection...

It was said of King Solomon that he was the wisest man in the world. Even the queen of Sheba traveled to Israel from Ethiopia to hear this great king's wisdom. But at the end of his life, King Solomon strayed from the wisdom he wrote and expressed to others.

These verses are a reminder to remember the higher calling God has for each of us. We are not to "waste our strength" or give ourselves to what ruins our life. It isn't just intoxication, it's settling for less than what is the best God intends.

There are much higher purposes in life than indulging in what occupies the lives of others. When we lose sight of the truth—the truth of God—we neglect what is right, true, and good. We become like everyone else who is adrift in life.

You and I may not be kings and queens, but if we know what is just and true, we are responsible to uphold these virtues, even on behalf of others who have no voice.

Make it personal...

Read through the Scripture text again to consider and answer the following questions

What gifts and skills has God given you? Are you utilizing those gifts and skills as God intended?

Do you follow along with the crowd, or stand up for what is right, true, and just?

Do you cave in to the expectations of those around you, or live by a higher code of life?

In what way do you speak up for the weak, help protect their rights, and defend those who have no voice or strength?