Gospel of John

Criticism Leads to Spiritual Blindness

The apostle John wrote his gospel much later than the other three gospels—about two to three decades later. John was concerned with the influence of Greek philosophy and legalistic Judaism confusing believers outside of Israel. His gospel emphasized the diving nature of Jesus, the Son of God.

The dual nature of Jesus—being human and divine—was hard to accept and understand in John’s time, just as it is now. Was Jesus really a physical man with a human soul? Yes! But the Jews in Galilee only knew Jesus as the son of Joseph the carpenter and Mary of Nazareth.

The early disciples and apostles had a limited understanding of Jesus being God’s Son. It was not fully clear to them as seen much later in the gospel (John 14:8-9). It’s the Father who reveals His Son’s divine nature. He is the One who sent the Son. This is what Jesus says to Peter after his declaration—”You are the Messiah, the Son of God!” (Matt 16:16-17).

When we only consider Jesus as the Son of Man, whose parents were Joseph and Mary, it’s hard to reason out how Jesus is also the Son of God—sent by the Father and divine in nature. This is the problem with only holding to a historical view of Jesus. This is why the Jews criticized Jesus when He said, “I am the Bread of Life that came from heaven.” They couldn’t get past their own human reasoning.

This segment of the story is better understood within the context of the previous verses, which are covered in the previous study.

Scripture

The Jews began to criticize Jesus for saying, “I am the bread that came from heaven.” They asked, “Isn’t this man Jesus, Joseph’s son? Don’t we know his father and mother? How can he say now, ‘I came from heaven’?”

Jesus responded, “Stop criticizing me! People cannot come to me unless the Father who sent me brings them to me. I will bring these people back to life on the last day. [vss 41-43]

The prophets wrote, ‘God will teach everyone.’ Those who do what they have learned from the Father come to me. I’m saying that no one has seen the Father. Only the one who is from God has seen the Father. I can guarantee this truth: Every believer has eternal life. [vss 44-47]

(John 6:41-47 GW)

Key phrase—

People cannot come to me unless the Father who sent me brings them to me. I will bring these people back to life on the last day.

Digging Deeper...

Review the Scriptures above as you answer the following questions

  • What do the Jews say about Jesus? What are they questioning?

  • How does Jesus respond to their criticism? What are the first 2 things He says to them in verse 43?

  • What does Jesus say the prophets wrote? How is this related to what Jesus says about the Father?

  • Who has seen the Father and what does Jesus guarantee?

Reflection...

This long discourse of Jesus, where He spoke of Himself as the Bread of Life, followed the feeding of the 5,000 on the other side of the Sea of Galilee. He uses the physical event of this miracle to illustrate His teaching on being the Bread of Life.

He uses this metaphor to describe Himself and His mission. The physical event is a reference point to explain spiritual truth. This is the value of figurative language—to use what is known to help explain what is unknown.

Jesus declares His divine nature in this third segment of His teaching. In the first segment (vss 26-34), Jesus says how eternal or spiritual food is more important than physical food. Jesus declares, in the second segment (vss 35-40), how the Father promises eternal life for those who believe in the Son.

Here, Jesus speaks of His relationship with God as His Father. Just as physical food nourishes the body, feeding on Jesus will nourish our soul. We are to have a relationship similar to the one He has with the Father. This relationship is eternal and spiritual in nature and is received by faith in Jesus as the Son of God.

In the rest of the discourse, Jesus will speak more on the importance of feeding on Him.

Taking it to heart...

Read through the Scripture text again as you consider and answer these questions

  • Do you have difficulty accepting or understanding how Jesus is both human and divine in nature?

  • If so, what is the most difficult for you to accept or understand—His humanness or His divine nature as the Son of God?

  • Do you understand how a personal relationship with Jesus by faith is how you have relationship with God the Father?

  • How and when have you entered into a personal relationship with the Lord?

Personalize it...

Meditate On This— Theologians have struggled for centuries to understand and explain the dual nature of the Lord Jesus—both human and divine. Yet, Jesus and the New Testament Scriptures declare this many times. It is only understood when the Lord reveals it to us.

Prayer Focus— When you find it hard to relate to Jesus as either human or divine as the Son of God, ask the Lord to reveal the truth of His dual nature to you in the Scriptures and by His Spirit to your mind and spirit (heart).

©2019—Word-Strong

Don't Be Afraid!

We’re told there are two responses to fear—fight or flight. But Jesus tells His followers a third response—Don’t be afraid! He tells them this more than once—even the night He was betrayed and arrested (John 14:1, 27).

Jesus says this to His disciples in the midst of a storm. Many of these men were experienced fisherman who spent long hours on their boats and this sea. They knew the dangers of sudden squalls on the Sea of Galilee.

But fear came upon them for a different reason—they saw Jesus walking on the surface of the sea. In other gospel accounts we’re told they thought Jesus was a spirit—a ghost. This wasn’t the first time Jesus told them not to be afraid while out on the sea in a storm.

Previously, He was with the disciples when a strong storm sent waves breaking over and filling their boat. But Jesus slept through it all until they woke Him because they feared for their lives (Mark 4:35-41). He calmed the storm and they were amazed. But this miracle was different. It was intended to prepare them for the future.

Scripture

When evening came, his disciples went to the sea. They got into a boat and started to cross the sea to the city of Capernaum. By this time it was dark, and Jesus had not yet come to them. A strong wind started to blow and stir up the sea.

After they had rowed three or four miles, they saw Jesus walking on the sea. He was coming near the boat, and they became terrified. Jesus told them, “It’s me. Don’t be afraid!” So they were willing to help Jesus into the boat. Immediately, the boat reached the shore where they were going. [vss 16-21]

On the next day the people were still on the other side of the sea. They noticed that only one boat was there and that Jesus had not stepped into that boat with his disciples. The disciples had gone away without him. 

Other boats from Tiberias arrived near the place where they had eaten the bread after the Lord gave thanks. When the people saw that neither Jesus nor his disciples were there, they got into these boats and went to the city of Capernaum to look for Jesus. [vss 22-24]

(John 6:16-24 GW)

Key phrase—

It’s me. Don’t be afraid!

Digging Deeper...

Review the Scriptures above as you answer the following questions

  • What do Jesus’ disciples do when evening comes?

  • Where were the disciples headed in the boat and what happens while they’re on the sea?

  • Who do the disciples see walking on the water and what is their reaction to this?

  • Who else looks for Jesus and the disciples and when do they arrive where the Lord and the disciples are?

Reflection...

When Jesus calmed the storm that threatened to sink their boat, Jesus was with them and they were amazed at Him and His power over the storm. But in this situation, the disciples are on their own in the boat until they see Jesus walking on the water.

This is the fifth miraculous sign of Jesus in John’s gospel. It directly follows the fourth great miracle where 5,000 people were fed and illustrates two important assurances and truths. The power Jesus had over nature—His omnipotence—and His faithful presence in the disciples’ lives—His omnipresence.

Jesus reassures them—”It’s me. Don’t be afraid!“ He’s preparing them for the time after His resurrection from the dead when they need to walk by faith rather than sight. That is, is spiritual presence instead of His physical presence.

His power over the storm and their immediate arrival at their destination (Capernaum), reinforces the Lord’s power over the physical world—creation— because He is the Creator. These are assurances for the present and the future—while He leads them as their rabbi and after His resurrection from the dead as their Lord.

While the disciples are learning to trust Jesus in preparation for walking by faith, the crowd of seekers are focused on themselves. This becomes more clear as the story continues to unfold in Chapter 6.

Taking it to heart...

Read through the Scripture text again as you consider and answer these questions

  • What does Jesus say to the disciples in the boat and how do His words seem surprising to them in these circumstances?

  • What do the crowd of people seem to be focused on and how does it seem to be in contrast to the disciples and Jesus?

  • Imagine yourself in the boat when the disciples see Jesus walking on the water—Do you understand their reaction?

  • When life circumstances seem threatening or challenging—Do you have the assurance of the Lord’s presence and power with you?

Personalize it...

Meditate On This— It may seem trite, but in the midst of the fears and storms of life Jesus assures us of His presence and power to help us through or overcome them. We need to be confident He is all-powerful and ever-present regardless of our emotions or circumstances.

Prayer Focus— Daily prayer, praise, and worship, along with reading and meditating on God’s Word, are important for preparing us to move forward in faith when facing overwhelming and threatening situations in life. These disciplines are valuable for developing assurance of the Lord’s presence and power in our life.

©2019—Word-Strong

Water Into Wine

People throughout the world are intrigued by illusions, magic tricks, and sleight-of-hand artists. It's not just because they're clever and entertaining but something inside us wants to see something supernatural.

When Jesus did miracles in the Bible, they weren't illusions or magic nor were they for entertainment. His miracles were bonafide supernatural events with a purpose.

They affirmed the supernatural and divine nature of Jesus as God's Son (John 1:114) and as the Savior of the world (John 3:16). Jesus' miracles also confirmed His message and mission.

When God Became Human

Generally, we all tend to not believe in what we can't see. Of course, this carries over to believing in God and the miraculous. Many will say it's not logical or rational to do so. And yet, we believe many things exist that are invisible to the naked eye and miraculous in nature—thoughts, atoms, and even feelings of love.

The reason it's not logical to believe in God is that it doesn't fit what we know in the natural world. This is our human dilemma. God is supernatural—He's above and beyond the natural realm. He will never fit within our limited logic. God's existence exceeds our capacity to know Him in a purely natural way.

God's Children

When does life begin—at conception or birth? Before 1973, the obvious answer would be at conception but the Roe v Wade Supreme Court decision changed that in America. That decision may have changed people's opinions but it didn't change basic biology.

In Asia, age is generally determined by conception and the lunar calendar. For centuries and centuries in the rest of the world and biologically, conception is seen as the beginning of life.