Proverbs of Solomon

Good Sense

A person who gains sense loves himself.

One who guards understanding finds something good.

A person with good sense is patient,

and it is to his credit that he overlooks an offense.

Home and wealth are inherited from fathers,

but a sensible wife comes from the Lord. (Proverbs 19:8, 11, 14 GW)

(Context—Proverbs 19:1-14 GW)


Do we even know what good sense is? It used to be typical for parents to tell children to use good sense. Perhaps the expression is out of touch with our relativistic culture.

Even the expression common sense seems outdated and irrelevant today. But the need for good sense or common sense is greater than ever.

First of all, let’s consider what the phrase good sense means in these verses. In general, it speaks of sound judgment, discernment, or wisdom.

Within the context of Proverbs, the basis of good sense and wisdom is God—the One true and living God of Israel.

His revealed wisdom is found within the Scriptures. During Solomon’s life it included the first five books of the Old Testament, the history of Israel and many of the Psalms up to the time of his father King David.

These three verses give us insight into the benefits of good sense—why it’s valuable—personally, in all our relationships, and at home.

Personally

When we gain good sense and wisdom, we love ourself in the best way. Not in the popular self-indulgent or selfish way. The sense of verse 8 from the original language is to love one’s own soul. Another way of saying it is—the person who gains wisdom is his own best friend.

Relationships with others

An important benefit of wisdom and good sense is to help a person cope with difficult people and situations. The idea of patience here is to be slow to anger and to overlook an offense means to be not easily offended.

An old expression goes, “to take offense is to give it.” Wisdom and good sense enable us not to be hypersensitive and reactive when others say or do things that are offensive or irritate us. This is a valuable benefit in our times!

Home

Lasting wealth and security depends more on who rather than what. This verse is the positive contrast to the verse that precedes it (verse 13). A sensible wife is a gift from God. I know this firsthand! Don’t have a spouse? No problem! This could be a applied to wise parents and children, as well (see download below).

Here’s how I see these verses applied in my life—

The Lord gave me the gift of a sensible and wise wife. She helps me see others in a better light than I tend to do at first. I’ve personally gained from her wisdom and good sense.

Being thankful for her and loving her is like loving my own soul. After all, as it says in the Bible, we are “one flesh” (Gen 2:24), and when I love her as myself (Eph 5:28), I’m not so easily offended when she points out my lesser qualities, if you get what I mean.

Reflection—

How would you apply the insight from these verses in your life? When you gain good sense and wisdom, it’s much easier to live with ourselves, others, and those in our family.

Prayer Focus—

Start each day being thankful and ask the Lord for good sense and wisdom. God promises to give us wisdom when we ask Him for it (James 1:5). Ask the Lord for wisdom and guidance on how to benefit from it in all your relationships.

©Word-Strong_2018


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The Fallacy of Common Sense

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The teachings of a wise person are a fountain of life

to turn ⌊one⌋ away from the grasp of death.

Good sense brings favor,

but the way of treacherous people is always the same.

Any sensible person acts with knowledge,

but a fool displays stupidity. (Proverbs 13:14-16 GW)

(Context—Proverbs 13:14-25 GW)


Whatever happened to common sense? If it's so common, why isn't there more of it? It turns out... common sense isn't so common after all.

If you haven't said it, you've probably heard something like—"Use some common sense!"—as an admonition to use good judgment, act wisely, or think wisely before making a decision.

Sadly, common sense or good sense seems in short supply. The idea of good judgment that follows logical, rational thought just isn't so common or ordinary.

There's no question that it's valued but it doesn't appear to be common for the general population. Why not? What seems to be the hindrance?

Common sense, in order to be good, sound judgment, needs to have a sound basis or origin. Is there really such a thing as common sense? Yes, but at present, it's suppressed in our culture by what's popular, trendy, or whatever is most appealing at any given time.

For common sense to be sound, it needs to have a frame of reference and a reliable point of origin. Also, consistency and continuity are required for something to be common or accessible for everyone.

When something is uncommon, it's in contrast or at least significantly different than what is common. In other words, for something to be an exception to the rule, there needs to be a rule—a standard.

In a way, common sense gets pushed aside with a new common. The new standard is relativism and individual preference. These have become a new frame of reference for truth, morality, fulfillment, and even spiritual truth or spirituality.

Consider how flexible and accommodating companies and the service industry have become. Menus with "no substitutions or changes" are going by the wayside. Most of the time, you can have it your way for a small up-charge.

The consumer public wants their personal preference to prevail. We don't want what everybody else has unless it's customized to suit us. This demand for accommodation and individuality permeates our present-day culture in so many ways.

Even the truth is affected, or should I say, infected with this expectation for individualistic expression. Individualized interpretation of the truth results in confusion and a lack of understanding when it comes to theology and spirituality in general.

When everyone has their own interpretation of the truth or what truth is, there's no reliable standard to base truth on, which also affects what is considered sound judgment.

When you or I go to buy something at a store or fill the car with fuel, it matters what the cost is based on. What taxes are added to the cost? When it comes to measuring things, is it metric or American standards? When traveling abroad, what currency is used and what is the exchange rate based on?

Common sense needs a common point of reference as its basis, its standard. Otherwise, it has no lasting value. When it comes to navigating life and our relationships, we also need consistent and reliable values.

So, what is the standard for your life values? What truth are you relying on?

When you rely on your own interpretations of the Bible and its truth, you'll run into the same troubles others have who choose to go their own way and common sense will elude you.

If the truth of God written in the Scriptures isn't your point of reference, you don't have a trustworthy standard of truth. This is the message of the wise writings throughout Proverbs.

Good sense brings favor

Reflection—

Do you think you have common sense and good judgment? What truth are you relying on? If God's truth isn't your point of reference, you don't have a trustworthy standard of truth and likely lack sound judgment.

Prayer Focus—

Seek the Lord regarding whether or not you have common sense based on His truth. Ask God to give you discernment and confirmation of what good sense is and if you have it and are experiencing His favor.

©Word-Strong_2018


Avoiding Burnt Clothes and Burned Feet

The early chapters of Proverbs have several admonitions addressed to a son but they are not gender-specific. Yes, it sure seems like it but they were written during ancient times. Women did not have the place they have now in most societies. 

Many admonitions also focus on the dangers of immoral women, which sounds hypocritical coming from King Solomon who had a thousand wives and concubines. But figurative language is used a lot to emphasize a point, even overstating it.

Good Intentions and No Ambition

An old English proverb says the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Intentions are like ambitions without action. Unless there is follow-through, intentions become rash commitments or poorly conceived plans.

A common example is the New Year's resolution that sounds good and useful but isn't carried out or sustained. Intentions can be rash—not thought through carefully or without consideration of possible consequences.

Smoother Than Oil, Bitter As Wormwood

Some advice in Proverbs is pointed. Figurative language is used but the point made is hard to ignore, especially considering the author. King Solomon had 700 wives and 300 concubines. He knew a thing or two about women (1 Kings 11:3).

Though he was a great king and wise man, his heart was turned away from God to the idolatry of all his wives. He allowed their influence and their desire to rule in his life. So he turned away from the God whom he knew to be true and from the wise truth he spoke and wrote.