confidence

Waiting for a Conclusion to a Commitment

Ruth-devo-header-stories of redemption-2.png

“Stay here, my daughter, until you know how it turns out. The man won’t rest unless he settles this matter today.” Ruth 3:18 GW [see full devo text in NIV below]

Waiting is something most of us don’t do well. Come to think of it—I don’t know anyone who does it well in a consistent manner. We might like suspense in a story but not so much in real life.

American culture is focused on not waiting. We want things now not next week, next month, or next year. Conjecture about what could, might, or should happen fills online and mainstream media. This applies to politics, world events, sports, and the lives of celebrities.

When we send a text or email and don’t receive a timely reply—like, immediately—we’re either offended or wonder what’s wrong! Go to most stores and you’ll find more ready-to-eat or quick-to-prepare food available than the ingredients needed for making a meal from scratch.

Is the drive-through line to slow? Orders are taken before you get to the speaker and menu to order at some fast-food places. If that’s still too slow, there’s an App for that! to get your order in and done so you don’t have to wait at all!

Who wants to wait? No. One.

But the word wait or similar phrases about waiting occur throughout the Bible. Either as an exhortation or an observation of what people did.

Waiting to find out what will happen

This last segment of chapter three may not seem so important but it holds a valuable truth applicable in life for all of us.

After Boaz discovers Ruth laying at his feet in the dark on the threshing floor, he tells her to wait till the morning. He makes a commitment to resolve whether or not he can fulfill her request of taking her in as his wife and her kinsman-redeemer.

In the morning, before she leaves to return home to Naomi, Boaz sends Ruth back with six measures of barley. This is a wise move on his part.

Although we don’t know the exact amount, these six measures could weigh as much as sixty pounds, which is why Boaz tells Ruth—“Stretch out the cape you’re wearing and hold it tight.”

Why would Boaz do this?

Boaz knew Naomi set this situation up. He knew Ruth the Moabitess would not know or understand about the kinsman-redeemer provision in the Mosaic Law. Boaz wanted to reassure Naomi of the commitment he made to Ruth.

When Ruth returns home to Naomi, she shares what happened at the threshing floor, what Boaz said, and shows her the large amount of barley grain. Boaz sent a message to Naomi with this grain—a show of good faith on his promise to Ruth.

Naomi accepts this pledge from Boaz and advises her daughter-in-law to wait. She also assures Ruth of a quick resolve to the question of whether Boaz or the other man would be Ruth’s husband and the kinsman-redeemer of the family property.

Can you relate?

Obviously, Ruth wants to have Boaz for her husband. She knows him, respects him, and trusts him. But there’s a course of action that needs to take place. It can’t be hurried nor interrupted.

Ruth will just have to wait.

As the story continues in chapter four, we’ll see Ruth doesn’t have to wait too long. But it isn’t always that way in our lives. Not everything has a simple or timely resolve as Ruth’s wait.

As I reflect on my own life, I see many times where the wait was significant. Some of my requests and petitions and intercessions in prayer are still not answered. But I know to continue to pray and not give up (Luke 18:1).

Sometimes we wait for answers already given but they weren’t the answers we wanted or expected. This is where discernment is needed with a genuine trust in God as a Father who always has our best interest in mind.

Have you learned how to wait with a genuine trust in the Lord?

Reflection—

Wait for the Lord; be strong and take heart and wait for the Lord. (Psalm 27:14 NIV)

Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him; (Psalm 37:7 NIV)

For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence, for my hope is from him. (Psalm 62.5 ESV)

Prayer Focus—

When you come to a life situation where you need to wait on God, ask Him for the grace and confidence to trust Him, and thank Him in advance as an expression of trust.


Devo Scripture Text

So she lay at his feet until morning, but got up before anyone could be recognized; and he said, “Don't let it be known that a woman came to the threshing floor.” He also said, “Bring me the shawl you are wearing and hold it out.” When she did so, he poured into it six measures of barley and put it on her. Then he went back to town.

When Ruth came to her mother-in-law, Naomi asked, “How did it go, my daughter?” Then she told her everything Boaz had done for her and added, “He gave me these six measures of barley, saying, ‘Don't go back to your mother-in-law empty-handed.’”

Then Naomi said, “Wait, my daughter, until you find out what happens. For the man will not rest until the matter is settled today.”

(Ruth 3:14-18 NIV 84)


Click this link if you’d like more background on the Book of RuthRuth Background

Here are some Study Questions for a more in-depth study of RuthRuth Study Q’s

When Fear Is Strong

Photo by  Alfonso Ninguno  on  Unsplash

In the fear of the Lord there is strong confidence,

and his children will have a place of refuge.

The fear of the Lord is a fountain of life

to turn ⌊one⌋ away from the grasp of death. (Proverbs 14:26-27 GW)

(Context—Proverbs 14:14-33 GW)


The fear of God is often misunderstood. Western culture typically portrays fear as a weakness. It's certainly not seen as a strength. Think of the stories in horror and sci-fi movies that feed off fear as the main attraction and intrigue to keep viewers watching.

Some relegate the fear of God to being an Old Testament concept that no longer applies to followers of Jesus under the New Covenant of grace.

After all, when we see Jesus in the Gospels, we see a man who gives Himself as a sacrifice for the salvation of humanity—a gift of perfect love, and who heals people and has concern for the outcasts.

2 different fears

It's common for people to confuse the general idea of fear with the fear of God but they're different. The fear of God is not what is more typically in mind which is a fear of anxiety.

The simplest definition of the fear of God is reverence. But the fear of God, as expressed in several places in the Bible, speaks of respect, awe, holiness, and so much more. Similar phrases are found throughout the Bible, such as godly fear or the fear of the Lord, probably more than you might think. 

In these verses in Proverbs, the fear of God is "a fountain of life," and a place of refuge and strong confidence. The fear of God as a fountain of life is based in relationship with God and a personal response to His sovereignty as Almighty God.

The "strong confidence" comes from a trust in God because of who He is—much like a young child who looks up to and trusts in the strength of a parent. How many times has a child said something like, "My dad is bigger and stronger than your dad!"

Many times in Scripture, the Lord is described as a place of refuge. This is not an actual physical place of security but a sense of safety and rest based on a trusting relationship with God. God is sovereign, He rules over all and is greater than all and He can always be trusted.

How can the fear of God be a "fountain of life?"

God is the Creator and Originator of all life. When a person has a worshipful awe and respect of God, they tap into the One who truly holds our life in His hands, as the children's song goes.

Here is something Jesus said about fearing God and anxious fear—

Don’t be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Instead, fear the one who can destroy both body and soul in hell.
“Aren’t two sparrows sold for a penny? Not one of them will fall to the ground without your Father’s permission. Every hair on your head has been counted. Don’t be afraid! You are worth more than many sparrows. (Matt 10:28-31 GW)

Jesus declares that the fear of God is stronger and more valuable than the anxious fear we may have of others. So, the fear of God—reverence for God—is a counter to anxious fear.

This is what the apostle John refers to when he says—

There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love. (1 John 4:18)

One last thought on the fear of God as a fountain of life—the book of Proverbs begins with this—

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge. (Prov 1:7 GW)

The fear of God—or the fear of the Lord—is a loving awe and respect for Him—a perfect love that pushes out anxious fear when we choose to trust in the Lord.

(see below for more on the fear of God)

Reflection—

Which do you choose to rule over your heart and life? Anxious fear or the fear of God? Jesus declares that the fear of God is stronger and more valuable than the anxious fear we may have of others.

Prayer Focus—

If anxious fear seems to have a strong grip in your life, consciously and prayerfully remind yourself of God's greatness, His sovereignty over all, and His perfect love. Look up all the references to the fear of God (fear of the Lord) and consider these truths as you pray and entrust your life to the Lord.

©Word-Strong_2018


Here are some previous posts related to the fear of God—

The Purpose and Value of Proverbs

Honor and Respect

Taste and See

Would you like a free study guide for Proverbs?

Click Here to get a Free Study Guide for Proverbs

Not Afraid

Fear can paralyze or energize us. It's called the flight or fight effect. But the fear of fear—of sudden terror—is a bottomless pit. There's no end to it. It doesn't paralyze, it puts a person in a comatose emotional and mental state.

A fear of sudden terror is understandable for war-torn regions of the world and for people living under an oppressive government. In those situations, a general fear for one's life is realistic, but it's not for those of us who live in nations with some form of democracy or representative government.

A Contented Soul

People have sought peace of mind and contentment of soul since the beginning of humanity. Various religions, philosophies, and psychologies claim to offer ways of finding contentment and peace, yet the pursuit continues.

This pursuit intensifies during times of personal crises and in the midst of external conflicts and tension. But there's no prescription anyone can offer that measures up to what God offers.

My Guardian

God's design for the parent-child relationship is remarkable. It's a picture and model of God's original design for the relationship between Him and humanity.

Working with abandoned babies and children gave my wife and I a much greater appreciation of this. We saw the longing in every child to belong to their own family. This is something no institution, no matter how well run, could ever fulfill.