psalms

Pull Out All the Stops and Praise Him!

What is worship? It's a simple word but hard to adequately explain or describe. How is worship expressed? There are myriads of forms and ways for worship to be expressed, along with many opinions about it.

Our current English word worship originally came from the old English word—worth-ship—the realization and response to someone of great value, power, or who is worthy of respect.

A Watched Mouth

Have you ever said things you wished never escaped your lips? Of course, we all have! You can edit or delete a tweet or an email, but you can't recapture words spoken in haste, nor pull them out of the air as if they were never said.

The key to being careful with what comes out of our mouths is to surrender our heart and life to the One who knows us best. This is what we see King David do in this psalm.

Fear that Blesses

How can fear bring blessing? When it's the right type of fear. This psalm speaks of the fear of God and declares the blessing it brings. The fear of God is often misunderstood by believers and non-believers alike.

It's a matter of priorities. When a person honors the Lord—realizing who He is and how powerful yet merciful He is—blessing will follow.

Worship Is Better than Whining

Several hymns and worship songs are taken directly from this psalm. Although it begins with an uplifting invitation, it ends with a solemn reminder. It begins with encouragement and ends with a warning.

A simple truth is embedded in this psalm that is easily missed. You've heard of selective memory but we can also be selective in what we hear or read.

You Alone Are God

It's been said the most common prayer is summed up in one word. "Help!" Indeed, many of King David's psalms are poetic prayers of help.

He was slandered and chased by King Saul and later by his son Absalom. At other times, it was a call for deliverance from situations he brought on himself.