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Why? — The Perennial Question

Moving beyond the dark cloud

I just couldn’t shake the heaviness.

It seemed to hold on to me no matter how much I prayed or read my Bible.

Why?!

This was my continuing question of God as I endured a dark spiritual fog. It’s the perennial question we all ask when things don’t make sense or seem to go crossways to what we believe.

I was a young believer and recently married. We were very involved in our church and I served in various ways each week. We were doing all the right things. So, why did this heaviness stay with me?

I sought the counsel of others older in the faith and the answer was the same. It’s just a trial—a time of testing me and my faith. Just keep praying, reading the Bible, serving, and stay in fellowship. It was good advice.

But the dark heaviness continued.

This perplexed me and I kept trying to figure out what was wrong. Was I doing all the right things in a wrong way? No. It didn’t seem to be that.

This time of testing went on for weeks. Much longer than I expected or been told trials like this should go on.

More questions

Perhaps it was an intense spiritual attack?

So, I read about spiritual attacks and how to battle them. I would envision putting on the spiritual armor Paul spoke of in Ephesians (Eph 6:13–18 NIV). I would pray earnestly and claim victory over the enemy of my soul!

But the heaviness prevailed…

Continue reading this post on Medium—click here– Why?—The Perennial Question

The Nature of Encouragement

When you think of encouragement, who comes to mind? Who is an encourager in your life?

What does encouragement look like for you? Words? Actions?

Encouragement can be as simple as a smile and nod of agreement as you share something from your heart. It may be a kind word, sincere gesture of affection, or a timely prayer. 

I've had several people in my life who have been encouragers. I'm thankful to be married to one of them.

Barnabas

There is one person in the Bible, other than Jesus, who was a living example of encouragement. His name is Barnabas. His real name was Joseph, but he was called Barnabas, which means Son of Encouragement. He lived up to his name.

He is introduced to us as the early followers of Jesus formed into a church community. He is an example of the nature of this early community of believers. The apostles (church leaders) gave Joseph the name Barnabas, he didn't name himself. [Acts 4:34-37]

Barnabas was a follower of Jesus, and showed this by example

The early church was torn apart by a zealous Jewish leader named Saul, who would later be known as the apostle Paul.

After Saul (Paul) became a follower of Jesus the Messiah, other believers were afraid of him, including the leaders. They didn't trust Saul and wouldn't accept him as one of them, at first.

Barnabas the mentor

In steps Barnabas. He came alongside this new convert who had proved himself in Damascus where he became a believer.

Barnabas stood up for Saul (Paul). He vouched for him. Because people trusted Barnabas, they accepted Paul. [Acts 9:26-30]

True encouragers are trustworthy

Encouragers see the best in people

Barnabas knew Paul was special, with special gifts as a teacher and leader, and a special calling and purpose in life. When Barnabas was sent to Antioch in response to a great spiritual awakening, he remembered Paul, who was sent to his homeland of Tarsus.

Barnabas knew Paul's gifts of leadership were valuable and needed in Antioch, so he sought him out in Tarsus. (Acts 11:19-26)

Encouragers are humble enough to see past themselves

This resulted in a strong church established as an extension of the primary one in Jerusalem. It is out of this church, which was developed under Paul and Barnabas' leadership, that the first cross-cultural missionaries were sent out.

Barnabas and Paul, as primary leaders, were sent out to preach the gospel, make disciples, and plant churches. (Acts 13:1-3)

Encouragement is an important element in leadership

This partnership produced a great harvest of new believers and new churches. This growth resulted in a need to define what we call the Christian Faith today. (Acts 15) 

Although this partnership continued to have a great impact upon this powerful church body in Antioch, it didn't last.

A dispute broke out between Paul and Barnabas, and this partnership was broken, or so it appears. Why? Because Barnabas wanted to give a young man named John Mark a second chance. (Acts 15:36-41)

Encouragers are messengers of God's grace

Encouragers see beyond themselves

Barnabas is never mentioned in the book of Acts after this incident. Much has been made of this, with some people concluding that Barnabas was wrong in standing up to Paul. But was he?

Encouragers see beyond themselves for the sake of others

In later years, Paul realizes the great value John Mark was to the church. While imprisoned in Rome and writing to the church in Colosse, he says as much, "...Mark the cousin of Barnabas (concerning whom you have received instructions—if he comes to you, welcome him)" (Col 4:10)

Later, as Paul sees his life coming to an end during his second imprisonment, he makes a request. He asks for John Mark to be brought to him in Rome. Why? "Get Mark and bring him with you, for he is very useful to me for ministry." (2 Tim 4:11)

Barnabas, who had stood up for Paul and brought him to Antioch, did the same for John Mark. Had he not done so, would John Mark be useful in ministry? Would the Gospel of Mark been written?

Encouragement is valuable and useful

Encouragement isn't just pleasant words and helpful actions. It can include risking our own reputation for the benefit of someone else.

Encouraging others requires genuine humility

Encouragers reflect the nature of Jesus

Barnabas exemplifies the nature of encouragement. Although Jesus is our ultimate example, Barnabas gives us an example that is reachable.

What was Barnabas' secret? It's no secret at all. He was a true follower of Jesus, filled with the Holy Spirit—the Comforter and Advocate given to believers by Jesus.

Encouragement is intended to be a part of the nature of all followers of Jesus. [see Acts 11:24; also John 14:26; 15:26; 16:7-14]

If you want encouragement, give it away to others

If you want a real-life example consider Joseph, the man called Barnabas, the Son of Encouragement.

Look for someone who needs encouragement today and encourage them!

Thanks for passing the word along ;-)

The Art of Dying to Self

Most of us have heard of having either left or right brain dominance. Those who have a left-brain dominance are supposed to be more analytical, while those with right-brain dominance are more creative.

Art is defined as a creative skill or ability, and science is knowledge about something or study of a subject. Typically, art and science are seen as opposites, just as with left or right brain dominance.

And by the way, the idea of left or right brain dominance? It turns out to be a popular myth. So, maybe art and science aren't so opposite.

The Art of Dying

Dying is not a favorite topic for most of us. We want to avoid talking about it and would like to circumvent death itself. But it's inevitable here on earth.

As a pastor, I often saw how awkward most people feel around the survivors of loved ones who've died. What do we say or not say to them?

This is especially true in American culture. Most other cultures have specific customs and beliefs about death. Grief and mourning are natural, not something to ignore or avoid.

A Journey of Faith

Quoting a truth is easier than living it out in real life. Putting truth on a plaque or poster is nice, but it doesn't change a person's life.

Memorization of Scripture is good for retention, but it won't produce transformation in a person's life on its own. What we know in our minds doesn't automatically bring change in our hearts or our self-will.

Truth doesn't bring transformation until it's transferred from thought into action, which requires an active, personal faith.